Lauren E. Godshall, Partner

The following are synopses of notable holdings, some published and some not, rendered thus far in 2015 by Louisiana appellate courts.

Lauren E. Godshall, Partner

The following are synopses of notable holdings, some published and some not, rendered thus far in 2015 by Louisiana appellate courts.

 

The following are synopses of notable holdings, some published and some not, rendered  in 2016 by Louisiana appellate courts.

Meghan E. Smith, Associate Attorney

In the summer of 2013, the Board of Commissioners of the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority – East (“the Board”) named 97 oil and gas exploration and production companies, pipeline owners and operators, and hydrocarbon industry services defendants in a sweeping lawsuit filed in Civil District Court for the Parish of Orleans alleging that their operations have “scarred Louisiana’s coast with an extensive network of thousands of miles of oil and gas access and pipeline canals.”

 

Lauren E. Godshall, Partner 

In Louisiana's Department of Natural Resources may be the most important regulatory authority to the many oil and gas exploration and production operations in our state. The extensive development of oil and gas wells in our state has led by necessity to the creation of a complex regulatory machine, with different parts taking on their own separate roles.  

 

Sarah E. Segrest, Senior Associate Attorney

An overview of the December 2015 Sedona Conference Commentary on the Protection of Privileged ESI

Meghan E. Smith, Partner

On a certified interlocutory appeal from the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Washington, a United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit Panel reversed and remanded a lower court decision denial of a 12 (b)(6) motion brought by an owner/operator of a smelting facility to dismiss claims reliant on a theory that disposal and/or deposit of air emissions contaminants on land or water downwind from the site gave rise to liability under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA.) The decision marks the first time a higher court in the United States has specifically contemplated CERCLA’s application to air emissions depositing hazardous substances onto land or water downwind. In its holding, the Court explained that Congress intended CERCLA’s reach to only go so far as the edge of where the Clean Air Act (“CAA”) picks up. This delineation is meaningful because the CAA can provide more limitations on liability than CERCLA and the decision provides dicta on the “federal permit shield” provision of CERCLA.

Brett F. Willie, Senior Associate Attorney

The following are select environmental regulatory changes recently proposed and/or adopted by the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ) and the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (LDNR).

Brett F. Willie, Senior Associate Attorney

The following are select environmental regulatory changes recently proposed and/or adopted by the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ) and the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (LDNR).

Brett F. Willie, Senior Associate Attorney

The following are select environmental regulatory changes recently proposed and/or adopted by the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ) and the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (LDNR).